How to specify exceptions from wildcard settings in a logrotate configuration file?

14,911

Solution 1

The most elegant answer is to put thatonespecial.log in a separate directory so it wouldn't be able to match the wildcard.

If that won't work, then you can use globs to narrow down your wildcard. It's messy, but if you absolutely can't move the file location then it's probably your only real option. Something like this:

/var/log/mylogs/[!t][!h]*.log

Would match any .log files with at least 2 characters in their name that don't start with "th".

Solution 2

It seems that the overwriting of rules was implemented and it works now:

$ logrotate --version
logrotate 3.8.7

$ cat /etc/logrotate.d/test
# rotate application logs for 40 days by default
/home/myapp/log/*.log
/home/myapp/log/*/*.log
{
    daily
    compress
    delaycompress
    rotate 40
}

# rotate access logs for 1 year
/home/myapp/log/access/*.log {
    daily
    compress
    delaycompress
    rotate 365
}

$ logrotate  -d /etc/logrotate.d/test
reading config file /etc/logrotate.d/test

Handling 2 logs

rotating pattern: /home/myapp/log/*.log
/home/myapp/log/*/*.log
 after 1 days (40 rotations)
empty log files are not rotated, old logs are removed
No logs found. Rotation not needed.

rotating pattern: /home/myapp/log/access/*.log  after 1 days (365 rotations)
empty log files are not rotated, old logs are removed
No logs found. Rotation not needed.

While when tested on my local logrotate (version 3.7.8) the error was raised:

$ cat logr.conf 
# rotate application logs for 40 days by default
/home/myapp/log/*.log
/home/myapp/log/*/*.log
{
    daily
    compress
    delaycompress
    rotate 40
}

# rotate access logs for 1 year
/home/myapp/log/access/*.log {
    daily
    compress
    delaycompress
    rotate 365
}

$ logrotate -d logr.conf 
reading config file logr.conf
reading config info for /home/myapp/log/*.log
/home/myapp/log/*/*.log

error: logr.conf:12 duplicate log entry for /home/myapp/log/access/api_access.log
error: found error in /home/myapp/log/access/*.log , skipping
removing last 1 log configs

...

Solution 3

If you know the names of all logs, you could also specify them together in one rule:

/var/log/mylogs/{file1,file2,file3,file4,file5}.log {
    size 1000k
    copytruncate
    create 0644 root root
    rotate 99
    compress
    missingok
}

/var/log/mylogs/thatonespecial.log {
    size 1000k
    copytruncate
    create 0644 myuser mygroup
    rotate 99
    compress
    missingok
}
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Updated on July 19, 2022

Comments

  • MRA
    MRA 4 days

    For my logfiles I have the problem of all but one (or a few) files use the same configuration, while the rest has another one. I tried to realize this by giving a general configuration for all files and then overwriting this configuration for the few specific files later, e.g.:

    /var/log/mylogs/*.log {
                       size 1000k
                       copytruncate
                       create 0644 root root
                       rotate 99
                       compress
                       missingok
    }
    
    /var/log/mylogs/thatonespecial.log {
                       size 1000k
                       copytruncate
                       create 0644 myuser mygroup
                       rotate 99
                       compress
                       missingok
    }
    

    However, this raises an error:

    error: /var/log/mylogs/logrotate.conf:10 duplicate log entry for /var/log/mylogs/thatonespecial.log
    

    How should I handle such a situation properly? I certainly don't want to list the large number of standard log files individually, so the use of the wildcard configuration seems reasonable to me. But how can I then specify an exception among the wildcarded files?

  • cherouvim
    cherouvim almost 3 years
    This doesn't work as expected. Filename that.log will be ignored, but filename txxx.log will be ignored as well. For some reason the [!h] part is not playing any role. As soon as a file starts with t, then it'll be ignored.
  • drumfire
    drumfire about 2 years
    Very nice. I want to emphasize one thing because it's a bit counter-intuitive: the man page states: "later definitions override earlier ones." Your example is correct; I'm just saying this because I had expected the opposite would have been the case.
  • helvete
    helvete almost 2 years
    This doesn't work for me using logrotate 3.13.0 distributed as an alpine package. Different implementation perhaps...
  • flourigh
    flourigh over 1 year
    this not work in example /var/log/nginx/[!access].log the error.log not rotate but access.log rotate in another configure below